Weakness: Thorin Oakenshield

Weakness: Thorin Oakenshield

Chris is rolling his eyes right about now. Like, epically rolling them. Which is fine with me, because I could certainly name several female characters that would crowd the top of his blog’s “Weakness” category, if he had such a thing. (He doesn’t; his loss, I say.)

For the uninitiated, Thorin Oakenshield is a character of J.R.R. Tolkien’s, who, in the incarnation above, appears in The Hobbit series courtesy of Richard Armitage. I know this version of Thorin isn’t true to the book (there, he was positively ancient), but making a few of the dwarves hot was a brilliant artistic change by Peter Jackson. It’s a good way to rope more women into a fantasy series (okay, and men, too), while also making the lengthy viewing commitment of three movies more appealing. This isn’t to say the films cannot stand on their own, or that I wouldn’t have enjoyed them if all the dwarves actually looked like dwarves; on the contrary, this merely enhances my experience.

I know this change has also been widely debated among Tolkien fans and book purists, but talking about that really kills my jonesing buzz. Suffice it to say, movies like this are adaptations of books, so some amount of change is inevitable. Sometimes it’s for production reasons, or because of how something would translate visually. Sometimes it’s just artistic. And sometimes I get annoyed by them, too. But this one I happen to like, even if my reasons are not, um, precisely virtuous. It’s true that I love the archetype of the kingly and courageous knight. Can I help it if Thorin is also really easy to look at? And listen to? And…

And I should probably just stop there lest I get myself in trouble with some crack about him having a big sword or something. (Which he totally does – it’s called the Orcrist. Just saying.)

8 Comments Weakness: Thorin Oakenshield

  1. Sandy Beason

    First of all, it isn’t how big the sword is, it’s how you use it. That being said, I loved this blog. It reminds me why we just ‘click’ so well.

    Reply
    1. Kristin Smith

      Quite true! Though in this context, a larger sword is just more appropriate. No one wants to go into battle with a warrior who is wielding a pocket knife. That’s why this genre is called Fantasy! ;)

      Reply
  2. Alan

    Mr Armitage was in later series of Spooks, being very dark, brooding, sexy and english. I just thought you should know.

    Reply
  3. Sabsi

    I’m with you here. Making some – okay, two – of the dwarves more, erm, visually appealling was a smart move.

    PS: I have loved Richard Armitage since seeing him in “The Vicard of Dibley”. He’s precioussssss!

    Reply
    1. Kristin Smith

      I assume you are speaking of Thorin’s nephew, Kili? He was the other dwarf I alluded to in my post. Yes, he’s gorgeous as well, though I wish the character wasn’t so immature. He became less appealing to me after that. I much prefer the serious and stalwart Thorin.

      Reply

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